qotd 1

The art of expression. To be vocal or expressive about one’s feelings, decisions, thoughts, ideas.

If there is much content (happiness) gleaned from just experiencing it, why is there an urge to express it?

  • Self-Gratification?
  • Expectations in Reciprocation?
  • A need to share?
  • Vindication?

Does it matter that the world/group/person outside of you need to know in the first place at all? More so, when there is no expectation on the expression?

I suppose the primary reason to express it is not so much as a selfish need to do so, but also to promote and spread the joy one experiences, hoping that the receiver may also experience a similar wave.

Perhaps it all ties in with the “giving” that hit me earlier, and I continue to do, just not record anymore.

On the flip side:

Maybe it’s really just the economy?

Like say for example: I may want to send a card expressing the feeling of “missing” a certain someone. The card costs $4:00, then there’s the postal charge and then the time spent in sending it out.  See what I mean?

Economy somehow seems to fare in all the instances I thought of.  That does make one a responsible citizen of the world at the very least. In times such as these, every action counts.

The only instance where this scenario ceases to make sense is when you are standing in the same physical space. Then we go back to our primary question:

Why express it at all in the first place?

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6 thoughts on “qotd 1

  1. IMHO, one expressess to share (if its a plesant feeling), may be to offload (if its an unpleasant one).. for people close to us, the expression matters and it matters to us to let them know of the same as that is the point of ‘connection’ in so many aspects..(i dont know if this made sense)

    • True. It does.
      It’s also the personality. Some can’t shutup even if asked to, and some can’t open up even if the world is falling apart. Both are extreme case idiots (yes, am included in that myself ;-))

  2. This has been on my mind for some time now. Paul Carr wrote on TechCrunch about the dystopia of real-time sharing, where people attending concerts or parties are more interested in sharing photos and tweets on social networks, than enjoying the event itself.

    Certainly, food for more thought.

    • Oh yes, I read that article, or maybe something similar some time ago. It’s just like the videographer is given more importance at a wedding than the guests or family :-)

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